Graduate Programs (MBA, MDIV, Maics, mats, mals)

1. Master’s in Business Administration (MBA)

The Master of Business Administration (MBA) is designed for professionals who want to develop their leadership and managerial skills in order to achieve optimal performances in a progressively challenging global business environment. The MBA degree is planned to develop the skills required for carriers in business and management. The value of MBA, however, is not limited strictly to the business world. MBA knowledge can be applied to nonprofit organizations too.

Reformed University offers a 36-hour graduate degree designed to prepare students for careers in the field of business, teaching, and advanced academic studies.

Program Objectives (Learning Outcomes)

Upon completion of the MBA program, students will be able to:

  • Display competencies and knowledge in key business functional areas including Accounting, Finance, Marketing, Human Resource Management, Business and Its Legal Environment, and Management
  • Work effectively and professionally in teams
  • Possess the skills to identify professional issues in a variety of contexts
  • Apply decision-making techniques, using both qualitative and quantitative analysis, to manage issues
  • Possess the effective written and oral presentation skills for communication
  • Understand of ethical problems and the role and service of Christian leadership in all levels of business decision making
  • Conduct strategic analysis integrating all aspects of theoretical and practical applications.
Admission Requirements

The Admissions Committee will review all submitted information. Any student seeking admission to the MBA program must possess an accredited Bachelor of Arts degree or its equivalent and a grade point average of 2.5 on all previous

post-secondary credits to be admitted on other than a probationary status. Whenever deemed necessary, the Admissions Committee or the Admissions Office may also request an interview with the candidate for a final acceptance approval.

  1. Application form.
  2. Non-refundable application fee.
  3. Official transcripts sealed and mailed directly to Reformed University of all college, university, or seminary records, showing all courses pursued, grades received, and degrees earned, and indicating a minimum grade point average of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale or its equivalent.
  4. A certified copy of the applicant’s bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university.
  5. Two letters of recommendation from the applicant’s home church pastor or an ordained minister, a teacher or a college professor, and one other non-family person.
  6. An essay explaining the applicant’s interest in pursuing education at Reformed University.
Components and Requirements

Course Requirements
The degree program requires satisfactory completion of 36 credit hours of the MBA
curriculum. Non-Business Students who require prerequisite courses may have to complete a total of 45 credit hours to earn the MBA degree. The degree program requires all non-business major graduates to complete all the necessary prerequisite courses before selecting their MBA curriculum course sequence.


Course Distribution
Requirements for MBA program include the MBA cores (36 hours) and any pre-requisites (9 hours) that are required. Students wishing to pursue this degree program are recommended to schedule appointment to meet with the program director for consultation.

Curriculum

The MBA program at Reformed University offers a Master of Business Administration degree. Students are required to successfully complete 9 core courses (27 credits) and (3 electives or 9 credits) for a total of 36 credits (or 12 courses) in order to complete the MBA degree in Business Administration. (Please note non-Business students will complete an additional 3 courses or 9
credits, totaling a maximum of 45 credits to complete this MBA program.)
Students pursuing the MBA Program at Reformed University develop ethical business management and leadership skills with an emphasis on managerial decision-making, statistical research for decision-makers, and a focus on the changing landscape of project management.

Core Courses (27 Core Courses Are Required)

ACCT 550Managerial Accounting3
ECON 550Managerial Economics3
FINS 670Managerial Finance3
MGMT690 Research and Statistics for Management Decision
Makers
3
MGMT 700Merger and Acquisitions3
MGMT 720Project Management3
MGMT 730Strategic Management (Capstone)3
MKTG 660Global Markets3
MKTG 705Negotiation and Conflict Management3
Total27

Elective Courses (9 Credits Hours Required)

BUSN 500Business Environment, Law and Ethics3
ISDS 510Management of Information System3
MGMT 560Organizational Behavior and Leadership
in the 21st Century
3
MGMT 600Human Resource Management3
MGMT 610Entrepreneurship: Managing Innovation and
Executing Strategy for Growth
3
MKTG 500Marketing Management3
MKTG 645Interactive and Direct Marketing3
Total21

Prerequisite for Non-Business Graduates (9 Credit Hours Required)

ACCT 101Principle of Accounting3
ECON 201Microeconomics3
FINS 301Principles of Financial Management3
MGMT 301Principles of Management3
MKTG 301Principles of Marketing3
Total15

MBA Course Sequence

SemesterCoursesCredits
1ACCT 550 Managerial Accounting
ECON 550 Managerial Economics
ELECTIVE: Select an elective
3
3
3
2MKTG 660 Global Markets
FINS 670 Managerial Finance
ELECTIVE: Select an elective
3
3
3
3MGMT 690 Research and Statistics for
Management Decision Makers
MGMT 700 Merger and Acquisition
ELECTIVE: Select an Elective
3
3

3
4MGMT 705 Negotiation and Conflict
Management
MGMT 720 Project Management
MGMT 730 Strategic Management CAPSTONE
3

3
3
Total of 36 credits completed for graduation36
Course Descriptions


(All courses are for 3 credits unless otherwise noted.)
Prerequisites for Non-Business students (9 credits are required)

ACCT 101 Principles of Accounting
An introduction to financial accounting concepts and financial reporting, with the focus being on how decision makers analyze, interpret, and use accounting information. Emphasis is given to how accounting measures, records, and reports economic activities for corporations and on the relationship between accrual and cash flow measures in interpreting accounting information.

ECON 201 Microeconomics
This course focuses on basic economic problems leading to labor divisions in society and economic systems; mechanisms, concepts and theories of microeconomics in consumption, production, savings and investment of government and private sectors; analysis of the relationships and equilibrium of various markets of both closed and open economies; and general guidelines for dealing with basic economic problems.

FINS 301 Principles of Financial Management
This course is an overview study of concepts and techniques in corporate finance. Topics include investments, financial environment, securities markets, financial markets, financial statements and analysis, working capital management, capital budgeting, cost of capital, dividend policy, asset valuation, and decision making. The primary goal of the course is to help students achieve better financial outcomes for businesses with which they might be associated. This course provides an in-depth analysis of a wide range of topics on financial planning and analysis. Topics include the basics of financial statements, forecasting, budgeting, time value of money, stock and bond valuation, capital budgeting, maximizing shareholder value, and raising capital. *(Prerequisite: ACCT101 with a “C” (2.0)
or better.)

MGMT 301 Principles of Management
This course is an intensive and comprehensive introductory study and analysis of the management process from a general manager’s perspective, with particular attention paid to the area of strategic human resources management. It covers the following topics, among others: planning, organizing, leading, directing, and controlling for establishing and accomplishing business objectives, conflict management, interpersonal communication, the staffing and supervising processes, performance appraisal, managing groups and teams, management development and employee training. A variety of case studies are utilized.

MKTG 301 Principles of Marketing
Concepts and theories relevant to the study and practice of marketing are introduced. Topics include the changing global marketplace, marketing processes and planning, the use of market research, an understanding of consumers and customers, decision-making and the marketing mix, market segmentation, positioning and product differentiation. This introductory subject prepares students for further study across the broad spectrum of product, service, consumer, business-to-business, industrial, global and social marketing.

ACCT 550 Managerial Accounting
This course is an introduction to the fundamental concepts of managerial accounting, appropriate for all organizations. Students will study information from the entity’s accounting system, relevant to decisions made by internal managers, as distinguished from information relevant to users who are external to the company. The emphasis is on the identification and assignment of product costing, including activity-based costing, budgeting and other planning applications, information for decision making, planning and control for decentralized organizations. Topics include product costing methodologies, cost behavior, operational and capital budgeting, and performance evaluation.

BUSN 500 Business Environment, Law and Ethics
This course provides a survey of a number of areas of law affecting the conduct of business today. An extensive analysis of the law of contracts will be emphasized due to its importance in the conduct of business. The course will provide the student a practical understanding of how the law operates and the legal rights and responsibilities of parties involved in a transaction. Particular attention will be
given to the effect of landmark cases, and recent court decisions having a significant impact on the legal issues of the day. Topics include (a) the foundations of American law (b) business ethics and social responsibilities (c) overview of courts and procedures (d) torts, criminal law and cyber law (e) essentials of contract, negotiable instruments and agency law (f) debtor-creditor relationships (g) forms of business organizations (h) labor and employment law and (I) employment discrimination.

ECON 610 Managerial Economics
Managerial Economics is an applied branch of microeconomics that examines resource-allocation and tactical decisions that are made by analysts, managers, and consultants in the private, public, and not-for-profit sectors of the economy. In this course students expand their knowledge of key economic concepts and tools addressing the decision-making process. Students also examine the philosophy of optimization, the role of profit, and the relationship between managerial economics and other areas of business and economic analysis. Specific topics include the fundamental economic concepts of marginal analysis, net present value, risk, and decision analysis. The course also critically looks at areas of demand and forecasting, production and cost, pricing and output decisions, including strategy and tactics, long-term investment decisions, and risk management in the private and the public not-for-profit sectors of the economy. Students are required to apply economic tools to solve business problems using case analysis from a wide array of industries.

FINS 670 Managerial Finance
This course introduces students to financial theory and concepts. It incorporates the analysis, planning, and control of internal and external financial decisions of a firm with emphasis on corporate structure. In addition, the course explores important financial concerns facing multinational corporations, including ethics, and the role of information technology. Through the case study method, students acquire a practical knowledge of how to develop and examine financial reports that aid managers in making business decisions, in addition to gaining a working knowledge of managerial finance by learning to develop a systematic approach to financial analysis.

ISDS 510 Management of Information Systems
This course discusses how business professionals can leverage information systems through planning, oversight and management. Understanding the implications of information systems will be facilitated by learning to identify and evaluate potential opportunities to employ information systems, by understanding the role of information systems as a major facilitator of the fundamental business activities and by learning to manage information systems projects. One or more sections may be offered in any online format. This course also discusses and explains how to apply computer-based information systems to the management of organizations in the rapidly changing business in the Internet age. Topics include use of information to further the organization’s mission and strategy, the role of users, the development of electronic business and commerce, the evolution of enterprise resource planning systems, and the architecture of decision-support processes for managers. Technologies of computer systems, data communications, networking, databases, and knowledge management will be taught.

MGMT 560 Organizational Behavior and Leadership in the 21st
Century
This course provides a broad understanding of the theories, research, and practices related to organizational behavior and leadership in the contemporary global environment. Emphasis is on 8/26/19 33 examining the multilevel issues of change, behavior and leadership from political, cultural, and economic influence. The course provides a comprehensive overview of the social science theories and scholarship that seek to explain variations and similarities in the behavior of individuals, groups, and organizations. Comparative perspectives on motivation and leadership, workforce diversity, teamwork, communication, and ethics are explored. Emphasis is on geography, globalization, demographics, diversity, change management, and corporate responsibility.

MGMT 600 Human Resource Management
This course is designed to acquaint students with best practices for leveraging the competitive value of human capital in organizations. Students will be exposed to current issues and practices, associated with workforce management, including the legal and regulatory elements of managing employees, staffing, job analysis, performance management, disciplinary issues, compensation systems, benefits, and termination. Throughout this course, a strategic approach will be emphasized which encompasses methods of measuring the financial implications of human practices and exposure to a balanced scorecard approach to human resource management.

MGMT 610 Entrepreneurship: Managing Innovation and
Executing Strategy for Growth
This course focuses on the meaning of entrepreneurship and the process of starting and running an entrepreneurial business. The course covers a range of topics, including: the differences between entrepreneurial and conventional approaches to business; the attributes of a successful entrepreneur; the issues and obstacles facing an entrepreneurial enterprise; the creation of a business plan; and the ethical and social dilemmas facing entrepreneurs. The course also allows students to develop a concept for an innovative product or service.

MGMT 645 Interactive and Direct Marketing
This course examines the growth of various digital marketing formats for conducting interactive and direct marketing. In the current marketplace, consumers desire the speed and control that new digital and social media formats provide. Students are introduced to and build upon traditional foundations of direct marketing while learning how to apply new technology. Students learn how to develop a strategic and effective creative plan integrating different media platforms.

MGMT 690 Research and Statistics for Management Decision
Makers
This course stresses the practical use of statistics in collecting, organizing, analyzing, interpreting, and presenting data. Areas covered include descriptive statistics, inferential statistics, regression analysis, and time series analysis. Students learn to use statistical thinking to improve the managerial decision-making process.

MGMT 700 Mergers and Acquisitions
This course analyzes corporate mergers and acquisitions. Students develop skills necessary to structure a deal or form an opinion about a proposed transaction. The course evaluates the legal and regulatory framework for takeovers, such as filing requirements, fiduciary duties of the target board of directors, and antitrust regulation. The course uses a mix of lectures, projects, and cases analyses, to provide ample opportunity to understand and practice the application of standard corporate valuation methods.

MGMT 720 Project Management
The course provides an understanding of how new Agile principles and practices are changing the landscape of project management. The course is designed to give project managers fresh new insight into how to successfully blend Agile and traditional project management principles and practices in the right proportions to fit any business and project situation. The course provides a deep understanding of Agile project management principles and practices in order to see them as complementary rather than competitive to traditional project management. Topics include: Agile fundamentals, principles, and practices; roots of Agile in TQM and Lean Manufacturing; adapting an Agile approach to fit a business environment; planning and managing an enterprise-level Agile transformation; scaling agile to an enterprise level using enterprise-level Agile frameworks and Agile Project Management tools.

MGMT 730 Strategic Management Capstone
The purpose of this Capstone course is to explore the concepts, processes, and types of strategies that can be implemented to lead an organization toward creating and maintaining a competitive advantage in the existing global economy. This course will introduce the student to the field of strategic management by developing the strategic thinking through theories, concepts, and discussions about real-world business cases. It will provide the student with an understanding of the process of strategic analysis and planning for the long-term success of businesses. This course will allow students to design and develop a project which will demonstrate how managers incorporate strategic to drive their organizations to achieve superior competitive advantage over competing firms in the industry.

MKTG 500 Marketing Management
This course provides an in-depth exploration and practical application of basic marketing tools. These include product policy, pricing, promotion, distribution, sales management, and customer segmentation and retention. In most classes, we will analyze case studies that require us to identify marketing opportunities, refine value propositions, select customer segments and develop marketing programs for a variety of management situation.

MKTG 660 Global Markets
This course is intended to enhance students’ understanding of the complexities of marketing products and services in the international market. Students utilize an analytical approach to solving complex business problems in a dynamic, global marketplace. Emphasis is on applying a multidisciplinary framework to evaluate economic, financial, political, regulatory, socio-cultural, and technological issues when planning and implementing an international marketing strategy.

MKGT 705 Negotiation and Conflict Management
International marketing is important as the world becomes increasingly globalized. In an international context, marketing managers plan and conduct transactions across borders to create exchanges that satisfy the objectives of individuals and organizations. The fact that a transaction takes place “across national borders” highlights the difference between domestic and international marketing. The course considers the basic concepts of international marketing, the various activities necessary for international marketing planning, the beginning of international marketing activities to be conducted by a domestic firm, and relevant issues on strategy and marketing management relevant to expanded global operations.

Wilton Heyliger, Ph.D.
Program Director of MBA
wilton.heyliger@runiv.edu
Book Appointment

2. Master of Divinity (MDIV)

Reformed University’s Master of Divinity (MDIV) degree program is designed to prepare students for full-time service in the church of Jesus Christ. The MDIV program is a comprehensive basic theological program that enables students to integrate their understanding of the various disciplines of theology and ministry with their experience of the church and the world, thus preparing them for diverse ministry, pastoral ministry, mission, teaching, or ministries of social service and chaplaincy.

Reformed University offers a 90-hour graduate degree designed to prepare students for careers in the field of ministry, teaching, and advanced academic studies.

**Note that some of the MDIV courses will be provided in the Korean language.

Program Objectives (Learning Outcomes)

The Master of Divinity degree program aims to:

  • Prepare students with a foundational knowledge of the historical/theological content of Scripture with an application to selected contemporary situations.
  • Prepare students to interpret biblical writings in the Greek and Hebrew languages, using critical exegetical tools and writing a hermeneutical and exegetical paper.
  • Provide a basic knowledge of the history of Christianity.
  • Provide a basic knowledge of theology and Christian doctrines.
  • Enable students to integrate biblical and theological understanding with practical ministry strategies.
  • Equip students with the biblical, theological and ethical understanding necessary to analyze and discuss contemporary social issues affecting the church and society.
  • Enable students to develop and articulate a theology and theory of ministry that is relevant to their backgrounds and callings.
  • Provide opportunities to demonstrate necessary skills for ministry within a variety of traditions, churches and cross-cultural contexts.
  • Promote a biblical/theological understanding of the person, work and ministry of the Holy Spirit.
  • Enable students to articulate clearly their ministry/professional calling.
  • Enable students to develop a theology and theory of ministry that integrates biblical and theological content with practical ministry skills.
Admission Requirements

The Admissions Committee will review all submitted information. Any student seeking admission to the MDiv program must possess an accredited Bachelor of Arts degree or its equivalent and a grade point average of 2.5 on all previous post-secondary credits to be admitted on other than a probationary status. Whenever deemed necessary, the Admissions Committee or the Admissions Office may also request an interview with the candidate for a final acceptance approval.

  1. Application form.
  2. Non-refundable application fee.
  3. Official transcripts sealed and mailed directly to Reformed University of all college, university, or seminary records, showing all courses pursued, grades received, and degrees earned, and indicating a minimum grade point average of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale or its equivalent
  4. A certified copy of the applicant’s bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university.
  5. Two letters of recommendation from the applicant’s home church pastor or an ordained minister, a teacher or a college professor, and one other non-family person.
  6. An essay explaining the applicant’s interest in pursuing education at Reformed University.
Degree Requirements

The Master of Divinity degree is a 90-credit hour course program and is structured to be completed in four to five years of full-time study, and the maximum length of time allowed to complete the program is six years from the time of admission. Students in the Master of Divinity program must complete basic required courses such as Old- and New Testament-related courses, Introduction to the History of
Christian Theology, and Systematic Theology, in addition to other pastoral-related courses.

Course Distribution

Students are required to complete the following to be eligible for the Master of Divinity degree:

  • Core Courses (42 credits)
  • Capstone Project (6 credits)
  • Electives (minimum 42 credits)
Curriculum

Course Categories

BBLS: Biblical Studies: OT, NT, Bible Studies
BBLL: Languages: Greek, Hebrew
CCED: Christian Counseling and Education
CHHS: Church History
MISS: Missions
PSMN: Pastoral Ministry
PRCH: Preaching
THLG: Theology

MDiv Core Courses (42 credits)

BBLS500 Bible Study Methods and Hermeneutics 3 Credits
BBLL501 Biblical Greek I 3 Credits
BBLL511 Biblical Hebrew I 3 Credits
BBLS510 Survey of Old Testament 3 Credits
BBLS530 Survey of New Testament 3 Credits
BBLS551 Principles of Exegesis 3 Credits
THLG501 Systematic Theology I 3 Credits
THLG502 Systematic Theology II 3 Credits
THLG506 Christian Ethics 3 Credits
THLG507 Apologetics 3 Credits
CHHS501 Church History 3 Credits
MISS501 World Missions 3 Credits
PRCH501 Expository Preaching 3 Credits
CCED501 Pastoral Counseling Seminar 3 Credits

MDiv Capstone Projects (6 Credits)

CAPS501 Guided Evangelism & Discipleship 3 Credits


Internship (Choose one of the following courses)
CAPS502 Pastoral Internship 3 Credits or CAPS503 Missions Internship 3 Credits

MDiv Electives (Minimum 42 credits)

BIBLICAL STUDIES

BBLL502 Biblical Greek II 3 Credits
BBLL512 Biblical Hebrew II 3 Credits
BBLS511 Genesis 3 Credits
BBLS512 Exodus through Deuteronomy 3 Credits
BBLS513 Historical Books (Joshua through Esther 3 Credits
BBLS514 Old Testament Major Prophets 3 Credits
BBLS516 Old Testament Poetical Books 3 Credits
BBLS531 The Gospels 3 Credits
BBLS532 The Life of Christ on Earth 3 Credits
BBLS533 The Parables of Christ 3 Credits
BBLS534 Acts & Pauline Epistles (Except Romans) 3 Credits
BBLS535 Exegesis of Romans 3 Credits
BBLS536 Hebrews, General Epistles, & Revelation
(Except Johannine Epistles) 3 Credits
BBLS537 Theology of Paul 3 Credits
BBLS538 Theology of John 3 Credits
BBLS539 Johannine Epistles 3 Credits
BBLS552 Biblical Theology 3 Credits
BBLS553 Daniel & Revelation 3 Credits
BBLS554 The Kingdom & Covenants 3 Credits

CHRISTIAN COUNSELING AND EDUCATION

CCED502 Counseling Methods & Techniques 3 Credits
CCED503 Marital Counseling 3 Credits
CCED504 Introduction to Christian Mentoring and Coaching 3 Credits
CCED511 Christian Education Seminar 3 Credits
CCED512 Teaching Process and Media Presentations 3 Credits

CHURCH HISTORY

CHHS502 History of Fundamentalism 3 Credits
CHHS503 History of Contemporary Evangelicalism 3 Credits

MISSIONS

MISS502 Biblical Theology of Missions 3 Credits
MISS503 Cultural Dynamics in Ministry 3 Credits
MISS504 Preparing for Cross-Cultural Ministry 3 Credits
MISS505 Mission Strategy for Unreached Peoples 3 Credits
MISS506 Contextualization 3 Credits
MISS507 Intercultural Communication 3 Credits
MISS508 Intercultural Church Planting 3 Credits
MISS509 World Religions 3 Credits

PASTORAL MINISTRY

PSMN501 Spiritual Warfare 3 Credits
PSMN502 Evangelism and Discipleship 3 Credits
PSMN503 Local Church and Social Outreach Ministry 3 Credits
PSMN504 Small Group Process in Ministry 3 Credits
PSMN505 Personal Assessment & Ministry Vision 3 Credits
PSMN506 Organizational Communication 3 Credits
PSMN507 Children’s Ministry in the Church 3 Credits
PSMN508 Youth Ministry in the Church 3 Credits
PSMN509 Young Adult Ministry in the Post-Modern Era 3 Credits
PSMN510 Women’s Ministry in the Local Church 3 Credits
PSMN511 Pastoral Ministries 3 Credits
PSMN512 Introduction to Church Planting 3 Credits
PSMN513 Church Growth 3 Credits
PSMN514 Dynamics of Christian Leadership 3 Credits
PSMN515 Hymnology 3 Credits

PREACHING

PRCH502 Expository Preaching Practicum 3 Credits
PRCH503 Spiritual Life 3 Credits

THEOLOGY

THLG503 History of Doctrine 3 Credits
THLG504 Calvin & Reformed Theology 3 Credits
THLG505 Trinitarianism 3 Credits
THLG506 Christian Ethics 3 Credits

THLG508 God and Evil 3 Credits
THLG509 Contemporary Theology 3 Credits
THLG510 Contemporary Cults 3 Credits
THLG511 Roman Catholic Theology 3 Credits
THLG512 Anabaptist Theology 3 Credits
THLG513 Arminian Theology 3 Credits
THLG514 Puritan Theology 3 Credits
TRU500 Reformed University Faithfulness and Spiritual Journey 3 Credits

Suggested Progress Plan

(90 Credit Hours Required)

SemesterCourse CodeCourse TitleHoursRemarks
1BBLS500

BBLS510

BBLS530

THLG501
INS101
Bible Study Methods and
Hermeneutics
Survey of Old
Testament
Survey of New
Testament
Systematic Theology I
Chapel
3

3

3

3
P/F
Core

Core

Core

Core
IR
2BBLL501
BBLL511
THLG502
BBLS511
INS102
Biblical Greek I
Biblical Hebrew I
Systematic Theology II
Genesis
Chapel
3
3
3
3
P/F
Core
Core
Core
Elective
IR
3BBLL502
BBLL512
CCED501
BBLS531
INS103
Biblical Greek II
Biblical Hebrew II
Pastoral Counseling Seminar
The Gospels
Chapel
3
3
3
3
P/F
Elective
Elective
Core
Elective
4BBLS551
PSMN502
MISS501
CHHS501
INS104
Principles of Exegesis
Evangelism and Discipleship
World Missions
Church History
Chapel
3
3
3
3
P/F
Core
Elective
Core
Core
IR
5PRCH501
CCED511
BBLS537
THLG506
INS105
Expository Preaching
Christian Education Seminar
Theology of Paul
Christian Ethics
Chapel
3
3
3
3
P/F
Core
Elective
Elective
Core
IR
6PSMN512

BBLS552
THLG507
MISS506
INS106
Introduction to Church
Planting
Biblical Theology
Apologetics
Contextualization
Chapel
3

3
3
3
P/F
Elective

Elective
Core
Elective
IR
7PRCH502

CAPS501

PSMN511
THLG510
INS107
Expository Preaching
Practicum
Guided Evangelism &
Discipleship
Pastoral Ministries
Contemporary Cults
Chapel
3

3

3
3
P/F
Elective

Capstone
Project
Elective
Elective
IR
8CAPS502 or
CAPS503
MISS509
INS108
Pastoral Internship or
Missions Internship
World Religions
Chapel
3

3
P/F
Capstone
Project
Elective
IR
Course Descriptions

BBLL501 Biblical Greek I
An introductory study of the basic elements of New Testament Greek designed for those who have not studied Greek. Includes how it is written, word formation, sentence structure, vocabulary, and basic translation, with practice reading from the New Testament.


BBLL502 Biblical Greek II
A continuation of the grammatical studies begun in Biblical Greek I, with emphasis on principles of Greek syntax and the effective use of lexical, grammatical, and syntactical tools. Includes translation of portions of the Greek New Testament.
(*Prerequisite: BBLL501)


BBLL511 Biblical Hebrew I
An introduction to biblical Hebrew designed to equip the student with a basic vocabulary and an understanding of the essential principles of phonology, morphology, and syntax.


BBLL512 Biblical Hebrew II
A continuation of the grammatical studies begun in Biblical Hebrew I with emphasis on reading selected portions of the Hebrew Old Testament, increasing vocabulary, learning the basic use of language tools, and providing exposure to the major genres of the Old Testament. (*Prerequisite: BBLL511)


BBLS500 Bible Study Methods and Hermeneutics
Introduction to Bible study methods and rules of interpretation (hermeneutics).


BBLS510 Survey of Old Testament
A survey of the Old Testament with emphasis on the biblical theology of the books, their genre, and application.


BBLS511 Genesis
An expositional treatment of the foundational book of biblical revelation. The key events that shaped the remainder of history, such as creation, the fall, the flood, and the Abrahamic covenant, are given special attention.


BBLS512 Exodus through Deuteronomy
An analytical exposition of four key Old Testament books, with special consideration of historical background, theme, interpretational difficulties, and the redemptive plan of God as evidenced and illustrated in the various aspects of the law, the priesthood, and the tabernacle. The study includes God’s preparation of Israel for entrance into the land of Canaan.


BBLS513 Historical Books (Joshua through Esther)
An analytical exposition of Old Testament books from Joshua though Esther, with special consideration of historical background, theme, interpretational difficulties, and the redemptive plan of God.


BBLS514 Old Testament Major Prophets
An exposition of OT Major Prophets, with emphasis on the biblical theology of these books, their genre, and application.


BBLS515 Old Testament Minor Prophets
An exposition of OT Minor Prophets, with emphasis on the biblical theology of these books, their genre, and application.


BBLS516 Old Testament Poetical Books
A study of the Poetical Books of the Old Testament (Job through the Song of Solomon), with attention to the literature and to the content, structure, and relevance of each of the books.


BBLS530 Survey of New Testament
A survey of the New Testament, devoting special attention to the major lessons of each book. Also examines the historical, cultural, and geographical setting for each book. Emphasizes both the understanding of the text and its applications to Christian living.


BBLS531 The Gospels
An exposition of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John with emphasis on the biblical theology of these books, their genre, and application.


BBLS532 The Life of Christ on Earth
A thematic study of the earthly life of Christ, tracing in detail the movements of His presentation, authentication, opposition, and rejection.


BBLS533 The Parables of Christ
An analytical and expository study of the parables of Christ, with attention to the hermeneutics of parabolic literature in the Scriptures.


BBLS534 Acts & Pauline Epistles (Except Romans)
An exposition of Acts and 10 of the Pauline Epistles (except Romans), with emphasis on the biblical theology of these books, their genre, and application.


BBLS535 Exegesis of Romans
An exegetical study of Romans, emphasizing the theological content and development of the book.


BBLS536 Hebrews, General Epistles, & Revelation (Except the Johannine Epistles)
An exposition of Hebrews, James, 1 and 2 Peter, Jude, and Revelation with emphasis on the biblical theology of these books, their genre, and application.

BBLS537 Theology of Paul
A first-hand study of the New Testament letters of the Apostle Paul as well as a critical reading of recent scholarly literature on these writings with a view to discovering the background, nature and distinctive of Paul’s theology.


BBLS538 Theology of John
A firsthand study of the New Testament literature of the Apostle John as well as a critical reading of recent scholarly literature on these writings with a view to discovering the background, nature, and distinctiveness of John’s theology.

BBLS539 Johannine Epistles
An exposition of 1, 2, 3 John with emphasis on the biblical theology of these books, their genre, and application.


BBLS551 Principles of Exegesis
An introduction to exegetical procedures and the practice of exegesis of various New Testament and Old Testament books. Procedures include outlining the argument of passages, doing word studies, validating exegetical decisions, and using exegetical tools properly. (*Prerequisite: BBLL502 and BBLL512)


BBLS552 Biblical Theology
An introduction to the discipline of biblical theology that includes study of its history, principles, and methods. Special attention is given to the development of Biblical theology, revelation, inspiration, sin, redemption, and eschatology.

BBLS553 Daniel & Revelation
An analytical study of Daniel and Revelation, with consideration of the many questions of interpretation and application in these important prophetic books.


BBLS554 The Kingdom & Covenants
A thematic study of the unfolding of the theocratic kingdom throughout the Scriptures, tracing its origin, historical development in various forms, and its ultimate consummation in the reign of Christ, together with a study of the biblical covenants in relation to the kingdom.


CAPS501 Guided Evangelism & Discipleship
A study of the methods of personal and group evangelism, with emphases on equipping laypersons to evangelize, the use of church and parachurch structures in evangelism, the care of new converts and development of discipleship, and the use of apologetics as well as current issues in evangelism and discipleship. The professor and students share together the evangelism and discipleship experience,
using various techniques of sound ministry.


CAPS502 Pastoral Internship
An internship for students to experience a local church ministry while preaching, teaching, and leading worship service. A student prepares and delivers sermons, teaches a class, and/or leads worship service under the supervision of the local church pastor. The student must serve at least 3 hours per week under the supervision of the local church pastor. At the end of the semester an evaluation of the student will be written by the supervisor and submitted to the school, along with the student’s internship ministry report.


CAPS503 Missions Internship
A specialized field-involvement program designed to encourage interest in and offer experience in cross-cultural ministries. Each student will be accountable to both on-campus and off-campus supervision and will be given exposure to as many aspects of missions as possible in view of the particular field assignment and the maturity of the student. Preparatory study is required with both reading and writing assignments; an agreed-upon subject will be researched while on the field, and a report or research paper must be submitted after the internship.


CCED501 Pastoral Counseling Seminar
A course designed to consider the special issues associated with the theory, practice, and administration of counseling in pastoral contexts.


CCED502 Counseling Methods & Techniques
A study of the major techniques and strategies that can be appropriately and effectively used in counseling individuals, including ways of determining and defining problems (diagnosis) as well as helping with the problem (treatment).


CCED503 Marital Counseling
A study of theory and practice of conjoint therapy with married couples. A number of theoretical perspectives and related clinical techniques will be studied, including biblical integration. Attention will also be given to intervention techniques for couples in distress.


CCED504 Introduction to Christian Mentoring and Coaching
This course is a practical introduction to mentoring and coaching. Attention is given to biblical principles, definitions, models, techniques, and available resources, with an emphasis on applications in counseling and leadership context.


CCED511 Christian Education Seminar
A seminar on the history of religious education from Old Testament times to the present and a study of theories of Christian education with emphasis on developing a biblical philosophy of education.


CCED512 Teaching Process and Media Presentations
A study of spiritual dynamics in effective Bible teaching and principles of learning and teaching, with practice in using creative classroom methods in an actual teaching experience. A hands-on exploration of speaker-support media for face-to-face teaching, with emphasis on clear communication and aesthetic design.


CHHS501 Church History
An exploration of the life and witness of the church from the New Testament era to the present through Protestant Reformation period.


CHHS502 History of Fundamentalism
A study of the fundamentalist movement from 1875 to the present, focusing on an analysis of its historical roots, theology, leaders, battles, and impact.

CHHS503 History of Contemporary Evangelicalism
A historical and theological analysis of the Evangelical movement as it distinguished itself from fundamentalism beginning in the 1940’s.


INS101-112 Worship Service
Non-credit bearing course of Worship service to provide the university community with opportunities for worship and spiritual enrichment.


MISS501 World Missions
A study of the biblical meaning and purpose of missions, the expansion of Christianity from Pentecost to the present. An attention is given to an examination of the modern Protestant mission movement.


MISS502 Biblical Theology of Missions
A study of the biblical foundations and purposes of missions, the nature of the missionary vocation, and the authority and scope of the New Testament in relation to missions.


MISS503 Cultural Dynamics in Ministry
A consideration of the dimensions and manifestations of culture as they influence ministry with special attention given to specific skills for exegesis in a cultural setting for ministry.


MISS504 Preparing for Cross-Cultural Ministry
Designed for those preparing for a short-term, cross-cultural missions experience, this course enables students to develop skills of intercultural awareness of and contextualization for specific cultural settings.


MISS505 Mission Strategy for Unreached Peoples
A study of ministry to unreached peoples and closure strategy in missions, with attention to identification, selection, and entry into modern unreached people groups; and the concept of homogeneous units as targets for evangelistic ministry.


MISS506 Contextualization
A study of contextualization from theoretical and practical perspectives, examining the relationship of gospel and culture, biblical guidelines, and various methods of contextualization. Students evaluate case studies of contextualization in diverse cultural settings dealing with a wide range of theological, ethical, cultural and ecclesial issues.


MISS507 Intercultural Communication
A study of the principles, processes, and pitfalls of communicating from one culture to another, designed to assist the student in working effectively across cultures. Emphasizes the importance of understanding the worldview of both the source culture and the receptor culture. Includes a treatment of diverse perceptions, values, expressions, logic, and linguistic difficulties.


MISS508 Intercultural Church Planting
A study of biblical principles behind church planting in the New Testament together with case studies and modern research relative to church planting in other cultures today.

MISS509 World Religions
Historical survey of the origin and growth of the major world religions, beliefs, practices, and worldviews of the major traditions will be examined, with special attention given to comparison and contrast with Christian beliefs and practices.


PRCH501 Expository Preaching
An introduction to basic expository preaching theory and skills, emphasizing preparation and delivery of a textually derived proposition with accuracy, interest, clarity, and relevance. (*Prerequisite: BBLS500)


PRCH502 Expository Preaching Practicum
An application and practice of the expository preaching, emphasizing the preparation and delivery of a textually derived proposition with accuracy, interest, clarity, and relevance. Students preach twice and receive evaluation from fellow students and the professor. (*Prerequisite: PRCH501)


PRCH503 Spiritual Life
A study of the biblical principles that govern true Christian character and service, with emphasis on the sufficiency of the divine provisions and the heart conditions necessary for holy living and spiritual power in ministry.


PSMN501 Spiritual Warfare
An examination of the spiritual warfare that servants of God face in Christian ministry. Attention is given to studies in biblical, historical, and contemporary perspectives of spiritual conflict.


PSMN502 Evangelism and Discipleship
A course designed to learn how to witness and evangelize on a daily life situation and how to make disciples who believed in Jesus Christ as a result of the evangelism.


PSMN503 Local Church and Social Outreach Ministry
An in-depth study of the kingdom-agenda approach to social outreach, with a focus on the creation and development of practical strategies for effective community impact through the local church.


PSMN504 Small Group Process in Ministry
The examination and practice of communication skills in small-group settings with emphasis on exercises that enhance those skills. Current small-group ministry models will be reviewed.


PSMN505 Personal Assessment & Ministry Vision
A course designed to assess and define a person’s ministry strengths and weaknesses and to develop leadership and interpersonal skills for more effective ministry, for the purpose of building confidence in future ministry decisions and developing vision.


PSMN506 Organizational Communication
This course is a study of communication principles for leaders. Students will develop communication skills, principles, and plans for their organization, staff, and/or ministry through an effective biblical process.

PSMN507 Children’s Ministry in the Church
A study of the nature and needs of children from birth through grade six, methods and materials for working with children, and administration of the children’s division of the church. Students participate in two teaching demonstrations to integrate classroom learning.


PSMN508 Youth Ministry in the Church
A study of the nature and needs of young people and objectives and methods of Christian education for youth. Group dynamics and discussion of practical problems and issues related to youth work are also discussed. Students will develop a working philosophy of youth ministry.


PSMN509 Young Adult Ministry in the Post-Modern Era
A study of postmodernism and its effect on the ministry of the church specifically focused on strategies for reaching young adults. Young-adult development and needs are discussed in light of shifting cultural forces. Students will develop a working philosophy of young-adult ministry.


PSMN510 Women’s Ministry in the Local Church
A course designed to provide the understanding and skills necessary to begin and implement women’s ministry in the local church.


PSMN511 Pastoral Ministries
A study of a foundation to integrate pastoral concerns and responsibilities with regard to evangelism, Christian education, discipleship, missions, developing church leadership, leading in worship and special services, long-range planning, community relations, and church ordinances.


PSMN512 Introduction to Church Planting
A course that provides the student with an overview of the theology, theory, and practice of a church planting ministry.


PSMN513 Church Growth
A study of factors of growing a church from a biblical perspective.


PSMN514 Dynamics of Christian Leadership
An analysis of the qualities and practices of the effective Christian leader based on principles in Scripture and related literature, with attention to devising a personal philosophy of Christian leadership.


PSMN515 Hymnology
This study addresses the importance of music in the worship service, the “language” of music, and how pastors must exercise careful oversight of the church’s music ministry.


THLG501 Systematic Theology I
A study of major Christian doctrines: Bibliology, Theology Proper, Anthropology, and Hamartiology.


THLG502 Systematic Theology II
A continuation of the study of major doctrines, including Christology and Pneumatology, Soteriology, Ecclesiology, and Eschatology.

THLG503 History of Doctrine
A study of the historical development of selected doctrines, with attention to the development of each theological theme from the church fathers to the present day.


THLG504 Calvin & Reformed Theology
A study of the theology of John Calvin with attention to its formative influence on Reformed Theology.


THLG505 Trinitarians
A study of the existence and attributes of the one God, the Holy Trinity; the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit in Scripture and in Christian history; and the ramifications of Trinitarian belief today.


THLG506 Christian Ethics
A study of biblical teaching on standards of personal conduct and integrity and their relation to the sanctification process. Throughout the course, attention is given to biblical perspectives on contemporary ethical issues facing the church and the minister.


THLG507 Apologetics
A study of the defense of Christianity with emphasis on the biblical and theological foundation, methodology, and contemporary challenges to the truth of Christianity. Selected intellectual challenges to core Christian claims for contemporary culture (e.g., the existence of God, the problem of evil, the resurrection of Jesus Christ, religious pluralism), along with Christian responses to those challenges,
are explored.


THLG508 God and Evil
An examination of objections to the Christian concept of God in view of the fact of evil and suffering.


THLG509 Contemporary Theology
A survey of the significant theological developments and positions which have achieved prominence during the 19th and 20th centuries.


THLG510 Contemporary Cults

An examination of the historical roots, origin, development, doctrines, leading personalities, and practices of the major religious cults in America. Also suggests approaches for presenting the historic Christian faith to the members of various cults.


THLG511 Roman Catholic Theology
A study of the tenets and representative literature of Roman Catholicism. Special attention is given to its distinctiveness compared with Protestant theology.


THLG512 Anabaptist Theology
A study of the origin, development, and distinctive theological perspectives of the Anabaptist movement, with special attention given to a comparison of its theology with Reformed theology.


THLG513 Arminian Theology
A study of Arminian theologians and their theology, noting their influence on contemporary theology.

THLG514 Puritan Theology
A study of the theological system emerging from the English Puritan tradition with emphasis given to the unique contributions made by the Puritans, and a biblical evaluation of their thought.


TRU500 Reformed University Faithfulness and Spiritual Journey
All students entering Reformed University are required to take this course. Reformed University’s faculty and students participate in this class to share their past spiritual journeys and their visions for their journeys after Reformed University, in a personal way. Participants will learn the ethos of Reformed University as well as that of each person in the class.

Young Pal Cho, D.Min.
Program Director of MDIV and Student Affairs
young.cho@runiv.edu
Book Appointment

3. Master of Arts in
Intercultural Studies
(MAICS)

The proposed Master of Arts in Intercultural Studies is designed to equip students both for careers in cross-cultural or multicultural environments and for ministries associated with spreading the gospel of Jesus Christ in cultures other than one’s own, including history and theology of mission, cultural anthropology, mission strategy, and social engagement studies among others. Its mission is to develop effective cross-cultural professionals who are competent communicators of Christ, sensitive to other cultures, and effective servant.

Reformed University offers a 90-hour graduate degree designed to prepare students for careers in the field of ministry, teaching, and advanced academic studies.

Program Objectives (Learning Outcomes)

The M.A.I.C.S degree program aims to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of God, the gospel, oneself, and others in the context of intercultural perspectives.
  • Formulate a statement of philosophy/theology, with respect to living, ministering, and working in contexts or cultures different than the student’s own.
  • Articulate a cross-cultural or international perspective with respect to professional training (e.g., in teaching, business, mission or development).
  • Produce written studies and reports manifesting their familiarity with the analytical and research tools available (particularly in the social sciences) and demonstrating their abilities to assess and adapt their objectives and activities to the cultural realities of their working environments. Communicate a clear understanding of the dynamic nature of the gospel, the spiritual and cultural traits of a growing church, the deeply intertwined relationship between the gospel and culture in which God’s self-revelation was given in culture, how it is now communicated across cultures, and how it is being faithfully lived out in appropriate contextualized acts of allegiance to the God of creation.
  • Manifest godliness of character, personal standards of integrity and morality, concern for human rights and justice, and a passion for the reconciliation of humanity with their Creator.
  • Offer an integrated learning approach which includes academic formation (theological engagement), spiritual formation (church involvement) and mission (community engagement).
Admission Requirements

The Admissions Committee will review all submitted information. Any student seeking admission to the MAICS program must possess an accredited Bachelor of Arts degree or its equivalent and a grade point average of 2.5 on all previous post-secondary credits to be admitted on other than a probationary status. Whenever deemed necessary, the Admissions Committee or the Admissions Office may also request an interview with the candidate for a final acceptance approval.

  1. Application form.
  2. Non-refundable application fee.
  3. Official transcripts sealed and mailed directly to Reformed University of all college, university, or seminary records, showing all courses pursued, grades received, and degrees earned, and indicating a minimum grade point average of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale or its equivalent.
  4. A certified copy of the applicant’s bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university.
  5. Two letters of recommendation from the applicant’s home church pastor or an ordained minister, a teacher or a college professor, and one other non-family person.
  6. An essay explaining the applicant’s interest in pursuing education at Reformed University.
Degree Requirements

The degree program requires satisfactory completion of 42 credit hours of the MAICS curriculum. The capstone course requires the completion of master thesis which integrates key theories and practical knowledge into a cogent and clear plan for intercultural ministry/leadership.

Course Distribution

Requirements for the MAICS include 42 hours of required courses over five semesters.

Curriculum and Suggested Progress Plan
SemesterCourse CodeCourse TitleCredits
1ISBT500
ISMC510
ISME550
Biblical Theology and Interpretation
Anthropology for Ministry
Teaching the Bible in Intercultural
Settings
3
3
3
2ISBT501
ISMC513
ISME551
Christian Theology
Contextualization in the Global Setting
Church Planting and Development in the
Postmodern Age
3
3
3
3ISBT502
ISME552
ISMC554
Historical Theology
Ministry in an Urbanized Society
World Christianity
3
3
3
4ISMC 511
ISMC 512
ISBT 503
Intercultural Communications
Christian Encounters with Other Religions
Reformed Theology of Mission and
Evangelism
3
3
3
5ISTP650
ISTP651
Research Methods
Thesis
3
3
Total42
Course Descriptions

ISBT 500 Biblical Theology and Interpretation
This is a foundational course on biblical interpretation which will provide students with the basic exegetical tools required to interpret and appropriate the biblical text for intercultural studies. The student will learn to recognize and work with the different literary genres of the Bible and will gain an overview of various hermeneutical approaches to Scripture. In the process, the student will be introduced to various research tools, methods, resources and practical skills for interpretation of scripture in order to appropriate the Bible well in our contemporary context.


ISBT 501 Christian Theology
This course introduces the student to Christian theology. It begins with a study of the nature and necessity of doing theology in the contemporary world with primary attention given to the authority of God’s self-disclosure in Scripture. The subject matter then shifts to consideration of the nature of the Triune God who has disclosed Himself to us, especially focusing on God’s action in creation and providence.


ISBT 502 Historical Theology
History of the church from the Apostolic Fathers to the modern era with an emphasis on the development of doctrine. Highlights key thinkers in the patristic, medieval, Reformation and modern eras.


ISBT 503 Reformed Theology of Mission and Evangelism
This course presents and examines world missions from three perspectives: the Biblical theology of missions; the history of missions; and current trends, methods, and issues facing missions, which is rooted in Reformed theology.


ISMC 510 Anthropology for Ministry
The study provides students a theoretical and methodological “toolkit” for understanding human interactions in every setting. Students become a critical thinker, learning to address social problems and cultural analysis through theory, data, and practical solutions. Anthropological study provides training well suited for the 21st century: students will demonstrate the capacity to engage the world by being intellectually rigorous, yet globally compassionate and gain the relational and analytic tools for effective cross-cultural engagement, both in America and abroad.


ISMC 511 Intercultural Communications
A study of the principles, processes, and pitfalls of communicating from one culture to another, designed to assist the student in working effectively across cultures. It emphasizes the importance of understanding the worldview of both the source culture and the receptor culture, including a treatment of diverse perceptions, values, expressions, logic, and linguistic difficulties.


ISMC 512 Christian Encounters with Other Religions
In this course, students seek what is true and holy in the world’s great religious traditions through encounter with diverse faith communities, with critical and constructive reflection on their history, beliefs, morals, and ways of worship. These diverse traditions are brought into dialogue with Christian theology and with the students’ own religious roots or philosophical views. A visit to a faith community is a requirement of this course. This course presents a comparative study of world religions, including but not limited to Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, and Islam in terms of Christianity.


ISMC 513 Contextualization in the Global Setting
This course considers the process of communicating a Christian worldview in a manner that is faithful to Scriptures and relevant to the world’s cultures. In part, this involves the process of exegeting or probing culture for spiritual themes. For this, this course explores the process of doing theology in a global context. Students must wrestle with issues of contextualization if they are equipped for gospel ministry in the diverse global context. Since the world has grown global, students must learn how to “do theology” from the perspective of global settings.


ISMC 554 World Christianity
This course explores the historical development and modern trends of Christianity among communities in the region of the world known as the Global South; it critically evaluates the symbolic systems, power structures, ideologies, values, and religious meanings at play in the Global South and Global North. Finally, this course examines the interaction between Christianity in the Global South and its Northern counterpart and articulate a vision for the global mission. For this, the body of Christ serves as the grounding framework of implementing world Christianity.


ISME 550 Teaching the Bible in Intercultural Settings
This course investigates dynamics of crossing cultures during biblical times and draws conclusions for cross-cultural encounters today. Also, the course explores the nature of teaching, the Biblical model of instruction, curricular design, the learner’s impact upon instruction, theories of practice, and methods of instruction, which is in intercultural contexts. The expositional process will receive special attention given that it undergirds the teaching process. This course centers on a biblical passage, describes the setting, and presents cross-cultural insights and a practical ‘crossing takeaway’ for teaching the bible interculturally.


ISME 551 Church Planting and Development in the Postmodern Age
This course provides an introduction and systematic overview of the process of church planting and consequent congregational development and nurture in the postmodern age. Included are biblical and theological rationales for church planting as an evangelistic strategy from a missiological and contextually sensitive perspective, as well as an introduction to specific tools, methods, and resources needed for the effective development of new congregations. After looking at existing and emerging cultures, this course centers on demonstrating how to reach people within those cultures, especially those caught up in the postmodern culture.


ISME 552 Ministry in an Urbanized Society
This course will provide an overview of the various approaches to urban ministry found in Toronto with a particular focus on inner-city ministry with the poor and marginalized. Various urban ministry practitioners will be invited to present their ministry to the class, both church-based, and parachurch and a number of site visits are planned. The goal of the course is to understand the issues involved in inner-city life, to discover what various ministries are doing in an urbanized society, to learn how to approach ministry in an urban context and to design more effective ministry with marginalized people. Students will learn how to evaluate their own communities and discover ways of reaching their neighborhoods.


ISTP 650 Research Methods
This course is designed to introduce student to the diverse field of intercultural studies with a focus on understanding intercultural competency from an international perspective. The first part of the course introduces key concepts and explores various perspectives in intercultural studies. Next, we will examine the development of intercultural instruments and models such as the IDI (Intercultural Development Inventory) and DMIS (Developmental Model of Intercultural Sensitivity) and some examples of qualitative and quantitative research based on them. The latter half of the course will address international and institutional approaches to intercultural education, looking at a range of case studies and
examples. Finally, we will examine the connections between intercultural competency and global citizenship, particularly in light of increasing internationalization in higher education. Throughout the course, students will be encouraged to take a hands-on approach to learning and to examine their own beliefs and experiences of intercultural learning as they concurrently engage with scholarship in the field.


ISTP 651 Thesis
In this course students will engage in writing a research paper that integrates knowledge from all the courses in the program into a thesis statement for intercultural studies. In this master’s thesis the student will identify key intercultural principles, models, or theories that have informed him or her in the formation of their own paradigm for intercultural ministry, to include communication, religious implications, societal and cultural issues related to effective ministry/leadership in a diverse world.

Young Pal Cho, D.Min.
Program Director of MAICS
young.cho@runiv.edu
Book Appointment

4. Master of Arts in
Theological Studies (MATS)

The Master of Arts in Theological Studies (MATS) degree at Reformed University is shaped by a conviction that the life of faith in today’s world may be enriched by deep exploration of theological traditions in dialogue with broad understanding of the complexities of our global context. In this program, students have opportunities to prepare for a variety of contributions to communities, to faith, and to theological knowledge. Because of its academic nature, many students who pursue a MATS will be able to pursue further graduate studies in numerous fields related to theology or serve in the non-profit sector, higher education, counseling, or various communities of faith.

The degree program requires satisfactory completion of 45 credit hours of the MATS curriculum.

Program Objectives (Learning Outcomes)

The MATS degree program aims to:

  • To articulate a deep understanding of at least one major theological tradition or of theological practice, thought, and structure.
  • To assess some of the major theories and methods in the scholarly study of Christianity and be able to analyze the connections between the study of religion and other academic and professional disciplines.
  • To be able to analyze the ways that knowledge of religion is shaped by the cultural, political, and social location of the knower, and to explain how cultural, political, and social processes and strategies of inclusion and exclusion have shaped religious formations, knowledges, traditions, practices, and institutions.
  • To be able to use the understandings of religion acquired in the program to engage creatively and critically in the contemporary practice of such fields as education, the arts, law, medicine, journalism, social service, or social change.
  • To be well-prepared to pursue the interdisciplinary studies and independent research typical of higher education and to be cognizant of diverse fields of doctoral study.
Admission Requirements

The Admissions Committee will review all submitted information. Any student seeking admission to the MATS program must possess an accredited Bachelor of Arts degree or its equivalent and a grade point average of 2.5 on all previous post-secondary credits to be admitted on other than a probationary status. Whenever deemed necessary, the Admissions Committee or the Admissions Office may also request an interview with the candidate for a final acceptance approval.

  1. Application form.
  2. Non-refundable application fee.
  3. Official transcripts sealed and mailed directly to Reformed University of all college, university, or seminary records, showing all courses pursued, grades received, and degrees earned, and indicating a minimum grade point average of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale or its equivalent
  4. A certified copy of the applicant’s bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university.
  5. Two letters of recommendation from the applicant’s home church pastor or an ordained minister, a teacher or a college professor, and one other non-family person.
  6. An essay explaining the applicant’s interest in pursuing education at Reformed University.
Degree Requirements

The degree program requires satisfactory completion of 45 credit hours of the MATS curriculum.

Course Distribution

Course Distribution

Requirements for MATS program include all required courses, totaling 45 credit hours. Students wishing to pursue this degree program are recommended to schedule appointment to meet with the program director for consultation.

Institutional Requirement
Students planning to enroll in this degree program are required by the University to attend WS501 Institutional Chapel Service. Students will receive a Pass/Fail grade upon completion.

Curriculum

Suggested Progress Plan

(45 Credit Hours Required)

SemesterCourse CodeCourse TitleCreditsRemarks
1MTSCB500

MTSCT510
MTSE550
INS101
Theological Overview of
Old Testament
Social and Theological Ethics
Philosophical Theology
Chapel
3

3
3
P/F
Core

Core
Elective
IR
2MTSCB501

MTSCC521

MTSE551
INS102
Theological Overview of
New Testament
Christian Education and
Evangelism
Integrative Theology
Chapel
3

3

3
P/F
Core

Core

Elective
IR
3MTSCB502
MTSCC522

MTSE552

INS103
Church History
New Trends of Homiletics:
Advanced Homiletics
Comparative Studies of
Religions
Chapel
3
3

3

P/F
Core
Core

Elective

IR
4MTSCC520

MTSCT511
MTSCT512
INS104
Missional Church in a
Changing Society
Covenant Theology
Apologetics
Chapel
3

3
3
P/F
Core

Core
Core
IR
5MTSE 553
MTRP 650
MTTW 651
INS 105
Spiritual Formation
Research Methods
Thesis I
Chapel
3
3
3
P/F
Elective
Project
Project
IR
Total45
Course Descriptions

*(All courses are 3 credits unless otherwise noted.)


MTRP 650 Research Methods
This course will review the research methods and writing guidelines needed to produce a mater thesis as the capstone project for this this course. Students will work with the instructor to select a topic that integrates the knowledge and insights gained from the courses in the program. The student will be adequately equipped with the knowledge and skills necessary to complete their thesis.


MTSCB 500 Theological Overview of Old Testament
The course is a study of Old Testament history, literature and theology with emphasis upon the historical development of key concepts of Old Testament. Among other essential themes, students explore the meaning of “image of God”, blessing and abundance, stewardship of cultural and redemptive mandates, covenant community and social ethics, justice and grace.


MTSCB 501 Theological Overview of New Testament
This course begins with a brief overview of the historical development of the New Testament and explores the contexts and contents of the various literary genres contained in the New Testament: The Gospels, the Acts, Letters and Epistles, and Apocalyptic Prophecy-Revelation. The course provides a familiarity with the New Testament books, as well as modern scholarly research, and exemplifies exegetical method. Also, it introduces major themes and issues in New Testament theology, with a special emphasis on the biblical foundations of the Christian faith.


MTSCB 502 Church History
This course offers a survey of the entire history of the church, in its many branches from the Apostles to the Pre-Reformation. Special emphasis will be given to standard theological themes, studied in their historical context, with people, places, and events, as well as to the spread of the church into all lands.


MTSCC 520 Missional Church in a Changing Society
This course will begin by analyzing the four-fold dynamic of gospel, biblical story, mission, and missionary encounter with culture. Then we will reflect on the church’s missional vocation in the world and congregational practices that sustain the vocation. Finally, we will attempt to grasp our changing Western cultural context.


MTSCC 521 Christian Education and Evangelism
The historical and philosophical development and the biblical principles of Christian
education and are examined and applied. Attention is given to the discipleship process and faith development, the teacher/learner process, small group development, age differentiated ministry needs in the local church, working with volunteers, developing lesson plans and directing the Christian education program of the church. In particular, this course focuses on empowering evangelism in the church through Christian education.


MTSCC 522 New Trends of Homiletics: Advanced Homiletics
An advanced preaching course emphasizing such topics as homiletical theory, history of preaching, persuasion, current preaching trends and models, and experimental preaching techniques. This course aims to help preachers become faithful expositors of God’s Word, the centrality of which is the Cross of Christ as God’s great act of redemption. It will seek to demonstrate how expository preaching unfolds the Bible’s underlying message of salvation by grace through faith. In the process it will seek to equip preachers to preach in a way that is alive and exciting to believers and seekers alike.


MTSCT 510 Social and Theological Ethics
An investigation of the biblical foundation for a system of ethics and its application to specific situations including sexual ethics, biomedical ethics, feminism in church and society, immigration issue, and economic issues. This course will be evaluating those issues from the point of Christianity.


MTSCT 511 Covenant Theology
This course is a study of Covenant Theology from exegetical, theological and historical perspectives. Covenant theology is the Bible’s way of explaining and deepening our understanding of (1) the atonement; (2) our assurance; (3) the sacraments; (4) the continuity of redemptive history; and (5) the dynamic of God’s sovereignty and Christian responsibility/piety. The doctrine of the covenants is thus important for both Reformed systematic and biblical theology (the study of special revelation from the standpoint of redemptive history).


MTSCT 512 Apologetics
This course is a biblical, theological and philosophical defense of the Christian faith. The study includes the impact that faith, reason and experience have on Christianity. It evaluates modern systems of thought and demonstrates the validity and defense of Christian doctrines as truth. It also addresses current societal questions and proposes a proper Christian response.


MTSE 550 Philosophical Theology
Philosophical theology includes the following topics: (1) questions about the nature of God; (2) questions about meaning and coherence of the doctrines of particular religions; and (3) questions about the nature of religious belief. We will discuss some questions under each of these headings. Just which questions we discuss will be largely up to you and the other members of the class. One topic we will focus on is diversity of religious views held by different people around the world, and the question of what (if anything) the existence of religious diversity tells us about whether it is reasonable to believe in one religion over another.


MTSE 551 Integrative Theology
This course provides advanced discussions to theological issues including the role of Scripture, God (Theology Proper), Creation, Humanity (Anthropology), Sin, Christology and ecclesiology from the point of constructive theology, defining the scriptural views and showing the arguments for them by bringing various theological views, refuting other views, and emphasizing the relevance of theology to these subjects.


MTSE 552 Comparative studies of Religions
This course provides an introduction to the study of religion by looking at topics and themes such as doctrine, ritual, scripture, mysticism, pilgrimage, and myth across the major religions in the world, while also introducing methodological approaches to the comparative study of religion. Student Learning Outcome: Students will develop a familiarity with the world’s major religious traditions and systems and be able to discuss their various similarities and differences in a comparative fashion.


MTSE 553 Spiritual Formation
This course is a foundational study of the process of making space for the Holy Spirit’s work of transformation into the likeness of Christ. It introduces spiritual practices, grounded in the Christian tradition, that sustain and nurture a life-long pursuit of union with God, the Bible, and theology.


MTTW 651 Thesis I
In this course the student will synthesize the theological information and theories gained from the courses to produce a graduate level thesis. This thesis will demonstrate comprehension of key theological implications relative to the topic of the paper, which should be guided by his/her anticipated area of ministry/vocation. The final product will reflect graduate level research and writing skills throughout

Young Pal Cho, D.Min.
Program Director of MATS
young.cho@runiv.edu
Book Appointment